According to the UN, Europe and Central Asia are home to  the least proportion of poor people at the world

According to the UN, Europe and Central Asia are home to the least proportion of poor people at the world

The United Nations Development Program (UNDP) has developed a regular report on global Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI) in various regions and countries around the world.

According to the 2019 global MPI research, over half of the 1.3 billion people identified as poor, some 663 million, are children under the age of 18.

The 2019 global Multidimensional Poverty Index shows that, in the 101 countries studied – 31 low income, 68 middle income and 2 high income. The publication includes case studies based on a number of indicators, including income, health, quality of work and the threat of violence.

The report states that Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia are home to the largest proportion of poor people, some 84.5 percent. Within these regions, the level of inequality is described as “massive”: in Sub-Saharan Africa it ranges from 6.3 percent in South Africa to 91.9 percent in South Sudan. The disparity in South Asia is from 0.8 percent in the Maldives, to 56 percent in Afghanistan.

Children bear the greatest burden. Some 663 million out of 1.3 billion people identified as poor are children under the age of 18. The vast majority of these children live in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. The picture is particularly dire in Burkina Faso, Chad, Ethiopia, Niger and South Sudan, where 90 percent or more of children under the age of 10, are considered to be multidimensionally poor.

According to the authors of the report, Europe and Central Asia have the least proportion of poor people. According to UN data, the poverty index in the European and Central Asian region is 1.1%. If everything is more or less clear with Europe as the region that is home for so-called “golden billion”, then the low level of poverty in Central Asia proves the effectiveness of the socio-economic policies of the states of the region. Although at the same time, human rights organizations and the experts often criticize Central Asian countries for policies pursued on these issues.

Anyway, under the global economic crisis, the countries of Central Asia have been able to maintain high standards of living, as evidenced by the UN data on the poverty situation on our planet. Of course, it should not lead to complacency. Poverty is a problem that should be dealt with on regular and systematic approach.